Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi

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Joseki Talkie

Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi 4: Bamboo approaches Yunzi’s 4-4 stone. Yunzi plays one-space pincer. Bamboo is happy to take corner profit and sente. Yunzi is satisfied with the influence towards the sides and center. Continue reading

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Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi

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Joseki Talkie

Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi 3: Yunzi approaches Bamboo’s 4-4 stone. Bamboo plays one-space pincer. Yunzi takes corner profit. Bamboo is happy to make a wall in sente. Continue reading

Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi

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Joseki Talkie

Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi 2: Bamboo approaches Yunzi’s 4-4 stone. Yunzi wants to develop the side and makes a moyo. Bamboo is happy to make a base and take sente. Continue reading

Joseki Talkie with Bamboo and Yunzi

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Joseki Talkie

Bamboo and Yunzi love to play and study josekis. Bamboo explodes with emotion with every move. He places stones on the board with force every time he gets excited. On the other hand, Yunzi remains calm and ignores Bamboo’s noise. She places stones on the board like cherry blossom petals falling on top of a calm lake even at the most intense moments. They both like to talk about the meaning of their moves. Continue reading

The Flow of Go: Beginner’s Guide from Start to Finish

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FlowofGoLast time, I said that Janice Kim and Jeong Soo-hyun’s “The Way of the Moving Horse” (Volume II of the Learn to Play Go Series) was the only book I know that discusses the process of Go from Opening to Middle Game to Endgame. Another good source that describes the stages of Go and the objectives a player must keep in mind at each stage is Antti Törmänen‘s “Ten’s Guide to Studying Professional Games”.

I will combine the knowledge from the book and the essay to make a general guideline for beginners regarding the flow of Go. Continue reading

1 on 4, 2 on 3

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1 on 4 2 on 3

Last week, I wrote about Cho Chikun’s introductory book on go. One of the lessons I found very useful in the said book was that a one-space jump on the fourth line and the two-space jump on the third is always connected. Continue reading