Dragon Killer Series: Failing the Ladder and Squeeze; Killing One Big Dragon

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Ladders, nets, and squeezes are the first things any aspiring Go player must learn. I know these things. Unfortunately, I still find ways to ignore them in my games. Here is one of the many examples where I failed the ladder and the squeeze. (Click image captured on Sabaki to view game in GoKifu).

How are your ladder and nets? Please share your experiences and critics in the comments section below.

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The Screw Up and the Catch Up

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Have you ever made a mistake in judgement and reading it almost cost the game but was able to make a comeback and win the game? I did in this game (click on the image captured on Sabaki to view the game in GoKifu).

Tell me about your similar experiences, and about my blunder and recovery in the comments below.

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A Reminder to Return to the Fundamentals

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I have so much fun with the GoKifu game sharing feature, I uploaded another one of my own game reviews. Please use Eidogo or GoSWF as viewer to avoid any errors. Picture of final board position captured on Sabaki.

Continue reading

Dragon Killer Series: Massacre of the Blind Dragon

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I found out that I can share my game reviews in GoKifu. This is easier than sharing my reviews in blog form. Apparently, there is an error when viewing with WebGo and Wgo player. Please use EidoGo or GoSWF for better viewing. The image above is a capture of this game in Sabaki SGF editor. Continue reading

The Exchange: Three for Six, Territory for Power

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Have you ever made an exchange, i.e. sacrifice a group so you can capture one of the opponents? This is an interesting game where Brown Stone found a way to sacrifice stones in exchange for a bigger profit. Also, the opponent made a little trickery during counting. Continue reading

The Fatal Endgame Mistake

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Nothing is more frustrating for a kyu-level Go player than losing a won game by making a mistake in the endgame. Here is an example from one of my games. Continue reading

The Seven Homunculi of Go: The Beast of Uncertainty

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In the third volume of the Learn to Play Go Series by Janice Kim and Jeong Soo-hyun, we learn the proper and improper mindset in the game of Go. More than an intellectual game, I think Go is a spiritual and philosophical endeavor too for serious players. I want to be a serious player, amateur I may be, and I look at the game as a battle for my mental, spiritual, and psychological growth (Deep I know, but that is how I see the game).

On the downfall of a player, Kim and Soo-hyun lists seven dangers. These seven dangers remind me of the seven homunculi (named and inspired by the seven deadly sins) in my favorite anime Fullmetal Alchemist by Hiromu Arakawa. Indeed, as scary and menacing as the seven villains Ed and Al have to face, I also struggle against these seven nemesis every time I place or click a stone on the goban. Continue reading

Haphazard Review: The Unfortunate Ko

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In the game of Go, a mistake can appear out of nowhere. Just when one thinks the game is over, a misplaced stone can turn the win into a defeat or an easy win into an all-or-nothing ko fight. Continue reading

See the Power of the Stones: Takeo Kajiwara’s Direction of Play

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Introduction

“I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” – Bruce Lee

I once read somewhere that reading 100 Go books once is inferior to reading one Go book 100 times. Like in martial arts, Go requires different skills before one can become formidable in the game. We players of this complex game can train and enhance our knowledge by reading books. Hopefully, the knowledge we consume will manifest into a skill that, hopefully, we can use in our matches. However, training one skill 1,000 times may not be sufficient to compensate the lack of training in other skills.

The best reply I read about the parable of one Go book read a 100 times is that reading ten books ten times each might be better. I agree on this proposition.

I believe that the principles of Go are as simple as its rules. The necessary skills needed in Go can be distilled in only 10 (or even less) skills, but that is for another article.

If I were asked what are the ten books I will read ten times, or even 100 times, Takeo Kajiwara‘s Direction of Play will be in my list. Continue reading