Dragon Killer Series: Failing the Ladder and Squeeze; Killing One Big Dragon

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Ladders, nets, and squeezes are the first things any aspiring Go player must learn. I know these things. Unfortunately, I still find ways to ignore them in my games. Here is one of the many examples where I failed the ladder and the squeeze. (Click image captured on Sabaki to view game in GoKifu).

How are your ladder and nets? Please share your experiences and critics in the comments section below.

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A Reminder to Return to the Fundamentals

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I have so much fun with the GoKifu game sharing feature, I uploaded another one of my own game reviews. Please use Eidogo or GoSWF as viewer to avoid any errors. Picture of final board position captured on Sabaki.

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Dragon Killer Series: Massacre of the Blind Dragon

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I found out that I can share my game reviews in GoKifu. This is easier than sharing my reviews in blog form. Apparently, there is an error when viewing with WebGo and Wgo player. Please use EidoGo or GoSWF for better viewing. The image above is a capture of this game in Sabaki SGF editor. Continue reading

The Exchange: Three for Six, Territory for Power

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Have you ever made an exchange, i.e. sacrifice a group so you can capture one of the opponents? This is an interesting game where Brown Stone found a way to sacrifice stones in exchange for a bigger profit. Also, the opponent made a little trickery during counting. Continue reading

The Fatal Endgame Mistake

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Nothing is more frustrating for a kyu-level Go player than losing a won game by making a mistake in the endgame. Here is an example from one of my games. Continue reading

The Seven Homunculi of Go: The Satyr of Disagreement

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Some of my losses follow a certain pattern:

I surround a relatively large territory and judge it as secure. My opponent invades it anyway. I get annoyed at my opponent’s stubbornness. My opponent destroys my big territory. I lose what is supposed to be a won game. Continue reading

Dragon Killer Series: Death of the One-Eyed Dragon

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In this edition of the Dragon Killer Series, Brown Stone discusses the power of direction of play and the power of stones in developing the Apex and creating advantage during middle game fighting. A failed attack during the early middle game resulted to sufficient strength for a late middle game kill of a one-eyed dragon.

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Dragon Killer Series: Revenge is a Dish Best Served with a Dead Dragon

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In this edition of the Dragon Killer Series, Brown Stone made sure a comeback opponent will not defeat him a second time. As a new convention in my reviews, I will refer to the center of the board as the Apex (as influenced by Janice Kim’s view of the goban as a pyramid with sides on the four directions). Brown Stone also discusses the process of a ko fight that arose near the end of the game. Continue reading

Dragon Killer Series: Separated and Dead

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This is part of the Dragon Killer Series where I review my games that involved the death of a dragon. You can read Part 1 here.

For Part 2, I will try something new in reviewing my games. First, I will refer to the sides of the boards as North, South, East, and West. I learned this from Janice Kim and Jeong Soo-hyun. Second, I will do counting at some points of the game. I only learned counting and its value lately. My counting style is still messy, but hopefully this helps my fellow beginners develop their own and adapt counting in their games. Continue reading

3 Questions Maybe AlphaGo Can Answer (If It Gets Strong Enough)

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A few hours from now, AlphaGo will face Lee Sedol in the first of a five-match series. Man vs. Machine. Human’s Glorious Mind vs. Artificial Intelligence. Humanity’s last stand against our machine overlords (exaggeration intended). Last time, I talked about how this event will be the victory of the human mind no matter result. While I believe Lee Sedol will win the $1 Million and probably defeat AlphaGo 5-0, I am still excited at how AlphaGo will perform against one of the top Go players today. However, if AlphaGo does defeat Sedol, then things will get more interesting in the Go world.

If AlphaGo learns the game better than any human being can, then maybe, just maybe (programmers help me on this), AlphaGo can answer the following questions: Continue reading